in-quo-totum-continetur:

langoaurelian: Athena of the Acropolis 

in-quo-totum-continetur:

langoaurelianAthena of the Acropolis 

(Source: blog.revolutionriche.com)

necspenecmetu:

Hendrik Goltzius, Phaeton, late 16th or early 17th century

necspenecmetu:

Hendrik Goltzius, Phaeton, late 16th or early 17th century

"One of many shifts" -Polytropos  

"One of many shifts" -Polytropos  

If I cannot bend High Ones, then I shall move Hell.

Juno, Virgil’s Aeneid (via sydamarie)

(Source: fatuouslibrarian)

jesatria:

Famous Queens of History: Nefertiti

Nefertiti (ca. 1370 BC – ca. 1330 BC) was the principal wife of the Pharaoh Akhenaten. The couple reigned over a very interesting time in Egyptian history. Akhenaten moved the capital to Amarna. He also worshiped one god- the sun disk, Aten. This was not received well by Egyptian society, which was accustomed to polytheistic religion. In the pictures above, you can see the family worshiping together. She and Akhenaten has 6 daughters. Some historians believe she may have ruled on her own for a few years after Akhenaten’s death, but this is debatable. Despite her great fame, her mummy has not yet been found.

She is perhaps the most famous Egyptian queen after Cleopatra. Her bust is one of the most iconic pieces of ancient Egyptian art.

historicaldetailsandstuff:

Sculpture of the Thracian gladiator. Note the curved short sword, identifying the style of the fighter.

historicaldetailsandstuff:

Sculpture of the Thracian gladiator. Note the curved short sword, identifying the style of the fighter.

historicaldetailsandstuff:

Detail of the Hallstatt scabbard depicting warriors carrying spears and shields. 6th Century BC.

historicaldetailsandstuff:

Detail of the Hallstatt scabbard depicting warriors carrying spears and shields. 6th Century BC.

myancientworld:

Detail of Antinous, the lover of emperor Hadrian. According to Hadrian he had ‘drowned in a river’; however, there is debate as to whether he in fact committed suicide or sacrificed himself.

myancientworld:

Detail of Antinous, the lover of emperor Hadrian. According to Hadrian he had ‘drowned in a river’; however, there is debate as to whether he in fact committed suicide or sacrificed himself.

myancientworld:

Mars, the god of war, 2AD. (Greek god of war: Ares)
In this particular artwork, the head had been chiselled out of a relief, and had been inspired by the image of Mars Ultor in the temple of Mars, in the forum of Augustus.
On his armour we see the head of Medusa, which was actually added in the 16th century. Other notable features of this art-piece include the sphinx and wings on his helmet.

myancientworld:

Mars, the god of war, 2AD. (Greek god of war: Ares)

In this particular artwork, the head had been chiselled out of a relief, and had been inspired by the image of Mars Ultor in the temple of Mars, in the forum of Augustus.

On his armour we see the head of Medusa, which was actually added in the 16th century. Other notable features of this art-piece include the sphinx and wings on his helmet.

milicentbrovovich:

The statue of Laocoön and His Sons (Italian: Gruppo del Laocoonte), also called the Laocoön Group, is a monumental sculpture in marble now in the Vatican Museums, Rome. The statue is attributed by the Roman author Pliny the Elder to three sculptors from the island of Rhodes: Agesander, Athenodoros and Polydorus. It shows the Trojan priest Laocoön and his sons Antiphantes and Thymbraeus being strangled by sea serpents.
Laocoön was killed after attempting to expose the ruse of the Trojan Horse by striking it with a spear. The snakes were sent by Poseidon[1] (although Athena or Apollo have also been suggested) and were interpreted by the Trojans as proof that the horse was a sacred object. The most famous account of these events is in Virgil’s Aeneid (See the Aeneid quotation at the entry Laocoön), but this very probably dates from after the sculpture was made.

milicentbrovovich:

The statue of Laocoön and His Sons (Italian: Gruppo del Laocoonte), also called the Laocoön Group, is a monumental sculpture in marble now in the Vatican Museums, Rome. The statue is attributed by the Roman author Pliny the Elder to three sculptors from the island of Rhodes: Agesander, Athenodoros and Polydorus. It shows the Trojan priest Laocoön and his sons Antiphantes and Thymbraeus being strangled by sea serpents.

Laocoön was killed after attempting to expose the ruse of the Trojan Horse by striking it with a spear. The snakes were sent by Poseidon[1] (although Athena or Apollo have also been suggested) and were interpreted by the Trojans as proof that the horse was a sacred object. The most famous account of these events is in Virgil’s Aeneid (See the Aeneid quotation at the entry Laocoön), but this very probably dates from after the sculpture was made.

(Source: norma-bara)